no wave  Tag

Follow tag Unfollow tag Edit View modifications Report an error Finished

This entry has been deleted. It is still temporarily accessible, but won't show up in any of the listings.

No wave was a short-lived avant-garde music and art scene that emerged in the late 1970s in downtown New York City.[3][4] Reacting against punk rock's recycling of rock and roll clichés, no wave musicians instead experimented with noise, dissonance and atonality in addition to a variety of non-rock genres, while often reflecting an abrasive, confrontational, and nihilistic worldview.[5][6][7]

The term "no wave" was a pun based on the rejection of commercial new wave music.[8] The movement would last a relatively short time but profoundly influenced the development of independent film, fashion and visual art.[9]

No wave is not a clearly definable musical genre with consistent features, although it was generally characterized by a rejection of the recycling of traditional rock aesthetics, such as blues rock styles and Chuck Berry guitar riffs, in punk and new wave music.[6] Various groups drew on or explored such disparate styles as funk, jazz, blues, punk rock, and the avant garde.[3] According to Village Voice writer Steve Anderson, the scene pursued an abrasive reductionism which "undermined the power and mystique of a rock vanguard by depriving it of a tradition to react against".[10] Anderson claimed that the no wave scene represented "New York's last stylistically cohesive avant-rock movement".[10]

There were, however, some elements common to most no-wave music, such as abrasive atonal sounds; repetitive, driving rhythms; and a tendency to emphasize musical texture over melody—typical of La Monte Young's early downtown music.[9] In the early 1980s, Downtown Manhattan's no wave scene transitioned from its abrasive origins into a more dance-oriented sound, with compilations such as ZE Records's Mutant Disco (1981) highlighting a newly playful sensibility borne out of the city's clash of hip hop, disco and punk styles, as well as dub reggae and world music influences.[11]

No wave music presented a negative and nihilistic world view that reflected the desolation of late 1970s downtown New York and how they viewed the larger society. Lydia Lunch noted: "The whole fucking country was nihilistic. What did we come out of? The lie of the Summer of Love into Charles Manson and the Vietnam War. Where is the positivity?"[12] The term "no wave" was probably inspired by the French New Wave pioneer Claude Chabrol, with his remark "There are no waves, only the ocean"

No wave was a short-lived avant-garde music and art scene that emerged in the late 1970s in downtown New York City.[3][4] Reacting against punk rock's recycling of rock and roll clichés, no wave musicians instead experimented with noise, dissonance and atonality in addition to a variety of non-rock genres, while often reflecting an abrasive, confrontational, and nihilistic worldview.[5][6][7]

The term "no wave" was a pun based on the rejection of commercial new wave music.[8] The movement would last a relatively short time but profoundly influenced the development of independent film, fashion and visual art.[9]

No wave is not a clearly definable musical genre with consistent features, although it was generally characterized by a rejection of the recycling of traditional rock aesthetics, such as blues rock styles and Chuck Berry guitar riffs, in punk and new wave music.[6] Various groups drew on or explored such disparate styles as funk, jazz, blues, punk rock, and the avant garde.[3] According to Village Voice writer Steve Anderson, the scene pursued an abrasive reductionism which "undermined the power and mystique of a rock vanguard by depriving it of a tradition to react against".[10] Anderson claimed that the no wave scene represented "New York's last stylistically cohesive avant-rock movement".[10]

There were, however, some elements common to most no-wave music, such as abrasive atonal sounds; repetitive, driving rhythms; and a tendency to emphasize musical texture over melody—typical of La Monte Young's early downtown music.[9] In the early 1980s, Downtown Manhattan's no wave scene transitioned from its abrasive origins into a more dance-oriented sound, with compilations such as ZE Records's Mutant Disco (1981) highlighting a newly playful sensibility borne out of the city's clash of hip hop, disco and punk styles, as well as dub reggae and world music influences.[11]

No wave music presented a negative and nihilistic world view that reflected the desolation...

Show full description

Wikipedia (EN)

Category: Genres


Followed by 0 user(s)

Addition date: 7/15/2020 2:30:45 AM


Siblings: krautrock, noise rock

Background illustration by みゆ | Other credits and source code | Content licensed under Creative Commons. | Privacy and cookie policy