Lo-fi hip hop  Tag

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"Lo-fi hip hop" redirects here. For the genre of jazz-influenced hip-hop, see Jazz rap. For the genres of hip-hop characterized by low sound quality, see Mumble rap, Memphis rap, and Cloud rap.
In 2013, YouTube began allowing its users to host live streams, which resulted in a host of 24-hour "radio stations" dedicated to microgenres such as vaporwave,[16] a derivation of chillwave.[17] In 2017, a form of downtempo music tagged as "lo-fi hip hop" or "chillhop" became popular among YouTube music streamers. By 2018, several of these channels had attracted millions of followers. One DJ, Ryan Celsius, theorized that they were inspired by a nostalgia for the commercial bumpers used by Toonami and Adult Swim in the 2000s, and that this "created a cross section of people that enjoyed both anime and wavy hip-hop beats."[18]

Nujabes and J Dilla have been referred to as the "godfathers of Lo-Fi Hip Hop".[19] In Vice writer Luke Winkie credited YouTube user ChilledCow as "the person who first featured a studious anime girl as his calling card, which set up the aesthetic framework for the rest of the people operating in the genre" and suggested that "if there is one shared touchstone for lo-fi hip-hop, it's probably [the 2004 MF Doom and Madlib album] Madvillainy".[18]

The root word "lo-fi" refers to music of an unprofessional nature, and contrary to popular conception, is not synonymous with qualities such as "warm" and "punchy".[20]

Lo-fi hip hop YouTube creators including Chillhop Records and ChilledCow have faced issues such as copyright strikes and YouTube bans. In February 2018, Chillhop Records received a copyright strike from anime house Studio Shizu for the use of a character from the feature film, Wolf Children. Though Chillhop Records only used a five-second loop of one character, the popularity of the video caught the attention of Studio Shizu. The founder of Chillhop Records and owner of the YouTube channel, Bas Van Leeuwen told the gaming magazine, Polygon, that the company worked with Studio Shizu in order to bring the livestream back on.[21] ChilledCow received another notice from YouTube, in February 2020, detailing that the channel had violated YouTube’s Terms of Service.[22] According to The Fader, soon after the shutdown of ChilledCow’s channel, a large influx of support from fans of the longstanding lo-fi curator was recognized as the reason why the popular lo-fi hip hop livestream was resumed after the mishap.[23]

In early 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, MTV News noted, "there might be something to be said for lo-fi hip-hop’s composition, and the way its creators mix simplistic melodies with a judicious use of words to create intense memories, feelings, and nostalgia" and stated that the quarantine in place in various countries "has led people to log more hours online due to boredom or virtual workplaces and schools, and livestreamed music performances are reaching their full potential."

"Lo-fi hip hop" redirects here. For the genre of jazz-influenced hip-hop, see Jazz rap. For the genres of hip-hop characterized by low sound quality, see Mumble rap, Memphis rap, and Cloud rap.
In 2013, YouTube began allowing its users to host live streams, which resulted in a host of 24-hour "radio stations" dedicated to microgenres such as vaporwave,[16] a derivation of chillwave.[17] In 2017, a form of downtempo music tagged as "lo-fi hip hop" or "chillhop" became popular among YouTube music streamers. By 2018, several of these channels had attracted millions of followers. One DJ, Ryan Celsius, theorized that they were inspired by a nostalgia for the commercial bumpers used by Toonami and Adult Swim in the 2000s, and that this "created a cross section of people that enjoyed both anime and wavy hip-hop beats."[18]

Nujabes and J Dilla have been referred to as the "godfathers of Lo-Fi Hip Hop".[19] In Vice writer Luke Winkie credited YouTube user ChilledCow as "the person who first featured a studious anime girl as his calling card, which set up the aesthetic framework for the rest of the people operating in the genre" and suggested that "if there is one shared touchstone for lo-fi hip-hop, it's probably [the 2004 MF Doom and Madlib album] Madvillainy".[18]

The root word "lo-fi" refers to music of an unprofessional nature, and contrary to popular conception, is not synonymous with qualities such as "warm" and "punchy".[20]

Lo-fi hip hop YouTube creators including Chillhop Records and ChilledCow have faced issues such as copyright strikes and YouTube bans. In February 2018, Chillhop Records received a copyright strike from anime house Studio Shizu for the use of a character from the feature film, Wolf Children. Though Chillhop Records only used a five-second loop of one character, the popularity of the video caught the attention of Studio Shizu. The founder of Chillhop Records and owner of the YouTube channel, Bas Van Leeuwen told the gaming magazine, Polygon, tha...

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Addition date: 7/14/2020 3:22:10 AM


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